Brownlee brothers complete one-two - Britain's Jonathan Brownlee edges out older brother Alistair to win the Stockholm stage of ITU World Series. Blackburn insist Rhodes not for sale - Blackburn Rovers reject two Hull City offers for Scotland striker Jordan Rhodes and insist he is not for sale. Bottas quickest in final practice - New Zealand cruise to record victory - New Zealand secure a bonus point in a record 51-20 win over Australia in the second round of the Rugby Championship. Briton Froome relishing tough Vuelta - The third and final Grand Tour of the season is "shaping up to be quite a race", says British contender Chris Froome. Mackay faces fresh text allegations - Fellaini and Herrera set for scans - Manchester United manager Louis Van Gaal says the injury situation is getting better but he is "a little thin in midfield". Sherwood would have taken Palace job - Tim Sherwood says he would have taken the manager's job at Crystal Palace had he been offered it after his interview. US picks 12-man roster for basketball World Cup (Yahoo Sports) - The Americans kept Derrick Rose and cut All-Star Damian Lillard and three others early Saturday morning, getting their roster down to the limit for the FIBA World Cup of Basketball. Though team officials had previously said they might carry extra players when they left for Spain on Saturday, and final rosters aren't due until next Friday, the Americans decided there was no need to wait. Kyle Korver, Gordon Hayward and Chandler Parsons also were cut, shortly after the Americans beat Puerto Rico 112-86 in their final home exhibition game. Gray pitches into 9th, A's top Angels (Yahoo Sports) - OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) -- Sonny Gray ended a monthlong losing streak, pitching into the ninth inning and leading the Oakland Athletics over the Los Angeles Angels 5-3 Friday night in a matchup of AL West rivals.

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Antonio 'Minotauro' Nogueira: 'Two more fights and I'm done' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 22, 2014, 7:12 pm]
Former multiple-time Pride and UFC heavyweight champion Antonio Rodrigo "Minotauro" Nogueira said in a recent interview with AG.Fight that he plans to retire by the end of 2015. The battered legend is old beyond his 38 years due to his many ring wars and resulting traumatic brain and joint injuries. "I know I won't fight forever," he said. "I’m focused on my gym’s business now. It’s a beautiful work, we have 9,000 students, 32 gyms...I plan to end my career by the end of the next year, I believe. One more year. It’s until the point my body can handle." Nogueira has lost his last two fights in devastating fashion, and has been finished in five out of his last nine fights , going back to 2008. He is currently recovering from a knee injury prior to his first round KO loss to Roy Nelson last April, as well as the knock out itself. Since Nogueira insists on fighting on, at least for another year, who would you like to see him fight? Let us know in the comments section. Follow Elias on Twitter @EliasCepeda & @YahooCagewriter

UFC's Cung Le visits, donates to Vietnam orphanage [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 22, 2014, 5:35 pm]
The days leading up to a fight are of crucial importance to an athlete. It's in these final days that the requisite selfishness of a training camp must reach it's peak so that the competitor has the focus they need to battle on fight night. UFC middleweight Cung Le has, at least in part, eschewed the usual solitary selfishness just days before he takes on Michael Bisping in Macau in the main event of UFC Fight Night Saturday. As a child, Le and his family fled Saigon and before hitting China to ready for his fight, the San Shou expert stopped in his native Vietnam to visit an orphanage. Le was so moved by the experience that he says he decided to give most of his sponsorship money for the Bisping fight to the orphanage to help provide for the children there. “I knew how crazy it was, but when I showed up there, it was very emotional,” Le said in a recent MMA Junkie interview. “[The orphanage only takes kids that were abandoned, and a lot of the kids, they have issues. Whether it’s with nerve damage or with brain swelling. It was something amazing for me to see. “I spent my day off going to this orphanage that was part of a temple...Basically, instead of taking the money from [my sponsors], I spent the money and bought a ton of rice and toys and candy, and gave the abbot there the rest of the money.” It's heart-warming to see a fighter think of others in the midst of an important and stressful time for themselves. Check out the video below of an emotional Le talking about his own sudden escape from Vietnam as a child. Follow Elias on Twitter @EliasCepeda & @YahooCagewriter

UFC's Dong Hyun Kim: Excitement equals opportunity [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 7:50 pm]
Dong Hyun Kim has long been regarded as one of the UFC's toughest welterweights. However, seven of his first eight wins in the promotion were by decision. There's nothing shameful about winning that much and often at the highest level of MMA, however Kim now admits that he was playing it a bit cautious earlier in his career. “In the early days of my career in the UFC, I was the only Korean fighter. My primary goal was to survive," he told Thomas Gerbasi in a recent interview. "I had to survive as the only Korean fighter and I felt like I was responsible for the booming of the UFC in Korea. But now, there are many Korean fighters in the UFC and they are performing well. I will fight like Dong Hyun Kim now. I am not young anymore. I am at the most important time of my career. I could choose to be either one of those seasoned fighters who win some and lose some or gamble and fight aggressively to gain the title shot. I'd rather venture to be aggressive. There is no opportunity for boring fighters.” "Stun Gun" Kim is currently riding a four-fight win streak heading into his UFC Fight Night bout against Tyron Woodley this Saturday in Macau. His last two fights were nasty KO wins. Woodley himself is doubtless hungry to get back on track after having his momentum stalled by a June decision loss to Rory MacDonald. Kim knows that the usually explosive Woodley will be coming after him, Saturday night. That's all right with the Korean warrior, however, because the new and improved Dong Hyun Kim will be striking right back. “He has finished many fighters,” Kim said of his opponent. “He may finish me as well, but I may finish him, too.” Who are you picking to win Saturday night, Kim or Woodley? Let us know in the comments section! Follow Elias on Twitter @EliasCepeda & @YahooCagewriter

Anderson Silva vs. Nick Diaz title implications? [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 6:42 pm]
Here at Cagewriter, we're all for Anderson Silva and Nick Diaz fighting one another, since they want to. It's a strange, freak-show type of super fight but also makes sense in certain ways for both men, so we're looking forward to it taking place early next year. Recent comments from UFC president Dana White which seemed to leave the door open to the fight having title implications, however, may make us re-think our enthusiasm. “I’m pretty pumped for that fight,” White told said recently. “Anderson, I can’t wait until he comes back. He’s one of my favorite fighters. And you know Nick Diaz. He’s exciting, and that’s the fight Nick wanted. That’s the fight the fans wanted to see. So we did it.” Fair enough. We're there with ya, Dana. “Anderson’s ranked No. 1 in the world right now at 185,” White continued, unbelievably, in reference to the UFC's official, but dubious and self-serving rankings. “So obviously, Diaz, who is a 170-pounder, if he beats Anderson, it would be a pretty big statement for him." Sure, Diaz moving up in weight and beating perhaps the best fighter in MMA history would be a "big statement." Calling a nearly 40-year old Silva, who is coming off of two straight knock out losses and who would not have fought in over a year the number one middleweight contender is silly (almost as silly as letting an un-licensed Vitor Belfort juice up and fight his way to a title shot abroad, and then letting him keep that title shot after failing another drug test once he was tested by a real commission once more, this year). We're not so opposed to Diaz getting a middleweight title shot were he to beat Silva as we are scared about what it could mean to have "The Spider" ranked #1. Should Diaz manage to beat the Brazilian legend, he would be a marketable challenger for Chris Weidman or whoever is the middleweight champ at that point. However, pretending that Anderson Silva is the top contender at this points means that, should he beat Di

Wanderlei Silva challenges Nevada's jurisdiction to order drug test [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 5:01 pm]
LAS VEGAS -- Wanderlei Silva's disciplinary hearing before the Nevada Athletic Commission on Thursday was postponed when Silva's attorney filed a motion questioning the commission's jurisdiction in the case. A collector sent by the Nevada commission arrived at Silva's gym to randomly test him on May 24. Silva declined to be tested, saying he didn't speak English well enough to fully understand what was happening. He subsequently left the gym and flew to Brazil. He had been scheduled to fight Chael Sonnen at Mandalay Bay in the co-main event of UFC 175 on July 5 and had appeared at a news conference at the MGM Grand with Sonnen on May 23. After Silva refused to take the test, he was yanked from the card and Nevada filed a disciplinary case against him. Nevada considers the refusal to submit to a test equivalent to a failed test, and sought to suspend him. Attorney Ross C. Goodman referred to commission regulation 467.850, paragraph 6. That reads, "A licensee who violates any provision of this section is subject to disciplinary action by the Commission. In addition to any other disciplinary action by the Commission, if an unarmed combatant who won or drew a contest or exhibition is found to have violated the provisions of this section, the Commission may, in its sole discretion, change the result of that contest or exhibition to a no decision." Goodman's argument is that regulation 467.850 (6) limits the commisison's oversight only to those it has licensed.  In his motion to dismiss, he wrote, "It is abundantly clear that the NSAC lacks jurisdiction to take disciplinary action over Mr. Silva, a non-licensee, for not submitting to testing that the NSAC had no authority to order." It is very common for a fight to be announced before a fighter has obtained a license to fight in the state where it will be held. The commission's argument has been that because Silva intended to fight in Nevada and that a formal announcement of the fight had been made in the media, that Sil

Wanderlei Silva challenges Nevada's jurisdiction to order drug test [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 5:01 pm]
LAS VEGAS – Wanderlei Silva's disciplinary hearing before the Nevada Athletic Commission on Thursday was postponed when Silva's attorney filed a motion questioning the commission's jurisdiction in the case. A collector sent by the Nevada commission arrived at Silva's gym to randomly test him on May 24. Silva declined to be tested, saying he didn't speak English well enough to fully understand what was happening. He subsequently left the gym and flew to Brazil. He had been scheduled to fight Chael Sonnen at Mandalay Bay in the co-main event of UFC 175 on July 5 and had appeared at a news conference at the MGM Grand with Sonnen on May 23. After Silva refused to take the test, he was yanked from the card and Nevada filed a disciplinary case against him. Nevada considers the refusal to submit to a test the equivalent of a failed test and sought to suspend him. Attorney Ross C. Goodman referred to commission regulation 467.850, paragraph 6. That reads: "A licensee who violates any provision of this section is subject to disciplinary action by the Commission. In addition to any other disciplinary action by the Commission, if an unarmed combatant who won or drew a contest or exhibition is found to have violated the provisions of this section, the Commission may, in its sole discretion, change the result of that contest or exhibition to a no decision." Goodman's argument is that regulation 467.850 (6) limits the commisison's oversight only to those it has licensed.  In his motion to dismiss, he wrote, "It is abundantly clear that the NSAC lacks jurisdiction to take disciplinary action over Mr. Silva, a non-licensee, for not submitting to testing that the NSAC had no authority to order." It is very common for a fight to be announced before a fighter has obtained a license to fight in the state where it will be held. The commission's argument has been that because Silva intended to fight in Nevada and that a formal announcement of the fight had been made in the media that

Wanderlei Silva challenges Nevada's jurisdiction to order drug test [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 5:01 pm]
LAS VEGAS – Wanderlei Silva's disciplinary hearing before the Nevada Athletic Commission on Thursday was postponed when Silva's attorney filed a motion questioning the commission's jurisdiction in the case. A collector sent by the Nevada commission arrived at Silva's gym to randomly test him on May 24. Silva declined to be tested, saying he didn't speak English well enough to fully understand what was happening. He subsequently left the gym and flew to Brazil. He had been scheduled to fight Chael Sonnen at Mandalay Bay in the co-main event of UFC 175 on July 5 and had appeared at a news conference at the MGM Grand with Sonnen on May 23. After Silva refused to take the test, he was yanked from the card and Nevada filed a disciplinary case against him. Nevada considers the refusal to submit to a test the equivalent of a failed test and sought to suspend him. Attorney Ross C. Goodman referred to commission regulation 467.850, paragraph 6. That reads: "A licensee who violates any provision of this section is subject to disciplinary action by the Commission. In addition to any other disciplinary action by the Commission, if an unarmed combatant who won or drew a contest or exhibition is found to have violated the provisions of this section, the Commission may, in its sole discretion, change the result of that contest or exhibition to a no decision." Goodman's argument is that regulation 467.850 (6) limits the commisison's oversight only to those it has licensed.  In his motion to dismiss, he wrote, "It is abundantly clear that the NSAC lacks jurisdiction to take disciplinary action over Mr. Silva, a non-licensee, for not submitting to testing that the NSAC had no authority to order." It is very common for a fight to be announced before a fighter has obtained a license to fight in the state where it will be held. The commission's argument has been that because Silva intended to fight in Nevada and that a formal announcement of the fight had been made in the media that

Wanderlei Silva challenges Nevada's jurisdiction to order drug test [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 5:01 pm]
LAS VEGAS – Wanderlei Silva's disciplinary hearing before the Nevada Athletic Commission on Thursday was postponed when Silva's attorney filed a motion questioning the commission's jurisdiction in the case. A collector sent by the Nevada commission arrived at Silva's gym to randomly test him on May 24. Silva declined to be tested, saying he didn't speak English well enough to fully understand what was happening. He subsequently left the gym and flew to Brazil. He had been scheduled to fight Chael Sonnen at Mandalay Bay in the co-main event of UFC 175 on July 5 and had appeared at a news conference at the MGM Grand with Sonnen on May 23. After Silva refused to take the test, he was yanked from the card and Nevada filed a disciplinary case against him. Nevada considers the refusal to submit to a test the equivalent of a failed test and sought to suspend him. Attorney Ross C. Goodman referred to commission regulation 467.850, paragraph 6. That reads: "A licensee who violates any provision of this section is subject to disciplinary action by the Commission. In addition to any other disciplinary action by the Commission, if an unarmed combatant who won or drew a contest or exhibition is found to have violated the provisions of this section, the Commission may, in its sole discretion, change the result of that contest or exhibition to a no decision." Goodman's argument is that regulation 467.850 (6) limits the commisison's oversight only to those it has licensed.  In his motion to dismiss, he wrote, "It is abundantly clear that the NSAC lacks jurisdiction to take disciplinary action over Mr. Silva, a non-licensee, for not submitting to testing that the NSAC had no authority to order." It is very common for a fight to be announced before a fighter has obtained a license to fight in the state where it will be held. The commission's argument has been that because Silva intended to fight in Nevada and that a formal announcement of the fight had been made in the media that

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Elizabeth Phillips: 'Not everyone is a fighter' [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 21, 2014, 3:00 pm]
UFC bantamweight Elizabeth Phillips may not be a grisled old veteran of MMA but she believes that she's got an old-school attitude that not many of her contemporaries posess. Being a great fighter is about more than simply being a great athlete, she knows. “There are athletes out there that come into MMA but I truly don’t believe that everybody is a fighter,” she told UFC.com recently. “[Being a fighter] comes with instinct and heart and your attitude. Even when you’re losing and you’re tired and you’re hurt, it’s how you handle it. You can’t teach that, and I don’t think everybody has it. Some people have it and some people don’t.” Phillips certainly knows all about gutting through fatigue and hurt. In fact, she made her UFC debut last June only two weeks after her previous fight. Phillips lost a controversial decision to Valerie Letourneau that night at UFC 174, but returns this Saturday in Macau at UFC Fight Night against Milana Dudieva. After five amateur contests and six pro fights, Phillips is positive that she belongs in the UFC, at this point. She's also grateful that she found MMA at a point in her life when she needed direction and discipline. Growing up in the Colville Reservation of Omak, Washington, Phillips ran in some tough circles and was on her way to getting into trouble as a youth before finding MMA. “If you went to a party on the rez or something like that, you knew that you were going to get into a fight,” she remembered. “Someone was going to talk [expletive] and someone was going to get their head knocked off their shoulders. It was crazy. I was getting in fights all the time when I was younger. I used to be this small, quiet person, and then all of a sudden everything changed and I was rowdy because that was just how it was. If you had a problem with somebody, you threw fists at each other and you handled it that way. That was definitely the lifestyle of Omak and where I grew up." At 24, Phillips began training

Past poor treatment of Bellator champions haunt Scott Coker [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 20, 2014, 4:23 pm]
Getting a new job where you're the boss is always a good thing, unless you have a giant mess left by your predecessor to clean up. That's the position new Bellator boss Scott Coker has found himself in after taking over for promotion founder Bjorn Rebney. Nothing typifies the confused and directionless mess that is Bellator more so than what the organization has done to/allowed to have happen to many of their champions in the past year or so. This week, Bellator released their sitting lightweight champion, Eddie Alvarez, so that he could sign with the UFC. Coker was the one to pull the trigger on that one but, of course, Alvarez' unhappiness with Bellator was deep-rooted in his heated and hate (and lawsuit) filled relationship with Rebney. Alvarez is just the latest poorly-handled Bellator champion and that blame really does seem to fall at Rebney's feet, so it still makes the list. What list? This list. Four worst Bellator champion goof-ups of the past year or so: 1. Bellator can't find new champion Zoila Gurgel challenger, ends up dropping women's divisions If your job is to put on fights and you can't find fights for a champion of yours, you're doing it wrong. Bellator once had solid female fighters on its roster, at a time when the UFC and Dana White still pretended women fighters were not good or plentiful. Over time, however, Bellator's matchmaking weaknesses made a casualty out of Gurgel and all women, most of whom went to Invicta. Coker has announced that Bellator is back in the women's MMA game, so hopefully he'll manage things much better than Rebney and company did. 2. Bellator releases the best fighter on their roster, welterweight champion Ben Askren All Ben Askren did was win, in dominating fashion, and with about the same finishing percentage as superstar and then-UFC 170 pound champ, Georges St. Pierre. However, winning impressively and repping Bellator hard wasn't enough for the promotion, and they let Askren walk away when they released him. Accor

Past poor treatment of Bellator champions haunt Scott Coker [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 20, 2014, 4:23 pm]
Getting a new job where you're the boss is always a good thing, unless you have a giant mess left by your predecessor to clean up. That's the position new Bellator boss Scott Coker has found himself in after taking over for promotion founder Bjorn Rebney. Nothing typifies the confused and directionless mess that is Bellator more so than what the organization has done to/allowed to have happen to many of their champions in the past year or so. This week, Bellator released their sitting lightweight champion, Eddie Alvarez, so that he could sign with the UFC. Coker was the one to pull the trigger on that one but, of course, Alvarez' unhappiness with Bellator was deep-rooted in his heated and hate (and lawsuit) filled relationship with Rebney. Alvarez is just the latest poorly-handled Bellator champion and that blame really does seem to fall at Rebney's feet, so it still makes the list. What list? This list. Four worst Bellator champion goof-ups of the past year or so: 1. Bellator can't find new champion Zoila Gurgel challenger, ends up dropping women's divisions If your job is to put on fights and you can't find fights for a champion of yours, you're doing it wrong. Bellator once had solid female fighters on its roster, at a time when the UFC and Dana White still pretended women fighters were not good or plentiful. Over time, however, Bellator's matchmaking weaknesses made a casualty out of Gurgel and all women, most of whom went to Invicta. Coker has announced that Bellator is back in the women's MMA game, so hopefully he'll manage things much better than Rebney and company did. 2. Bellator releases the best fighter on their roster, welterweight champion Ben Askren All Ben Askren did was win, in dominating fashion, and with about the same finishing percentage as superstar and then-UFC 170 pound champ, Georges St. Pierre. However, winning impressively and repping Bellator hard wasn't enough for the promotion, and they let Askren walk away when they released him. Accor

Past poor treatment of Bellator champions haunt Scott Coker [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 20, 2014, 4:23 pm]
Getting a new job where you're the boss is always a good thing, unless you have a giant mess left by your predecessor to clean up. That's the position new Bellator boss Scott Coker has found himself in after taking over for promotion founder Bjorn Rebney. Nothing typifies the confused and directionless mess that is Bellator more so than what the organization has done to/allowed to have happen to many of their champions in the past year or so. This week, Bellator released their sitting lightweight champion, Eddie Alvarez, so that he could sign with the UFC. Coker was the one to pull the trigger on that one but, of course, Alvarez' unhappiness with Bellator was deep-rooted in his heated and hate (and lawsuit) filled relationship with Rebney. Alvarez is just the latest poorly-handled Bellator champion and that blame really does seem to fall at Rebney's feet, so it still makes the list. What list? This list. Four worst Bellator champion goof-ups of the past year or so: 1. Bellator can't find new champion Zoila Gurgel challenger, ends up dropping women's divisions If your job is to put on fights and you can't find fights for a champion of yours, you're doing it wrong. Bellator once had solid female fighters on its roster, at a time when the UFC and Dana White still pretended women fighters were not good or plentiful. Over time, however, Bellator's matchmaking weaknesses made a casualty out of Gurgel and all women, most of whom went to Invicta. Coker has announced that Bellator is back in the women's MMA game, so hopefully he'll manage things much better than Rebney and company did. 2. Bellator releases the best fighter on their roster, welterweight champion Ben Askren All Ben Askren did was win, in dominating fashion, and with about the same finishing percentage as superstar and then-UFC 170 pound champ, Georges St. Pierre. However, winning impressively and repping Bellator hard wasn't enough for the promotion, and they let Askren walk away when they released him. Accor

Past poor treatment of Bellator champions haunt Scott Coker [Yahoo! Sports: Blogs: August 20, 2014, 4:23 pm]
Getting a new job where you're the boss is always a good thing, unless you have a giant mess left by your predecessor to clean up. That's the position new Bellator boss Scott Coker has found himself in after taking over for promotion founder Bjorn Rebney. Nothing typifies the confused and directionless mess that is Bellator more so than what the organization has done to/allowed to have happen to many of their champions in the past year or so. This week, Bellator released their sitting lightweight champion, Eddie Alvarez, so that he could sign with the UFC. Coker was the one to pull the trigger on that one but, of course, Alvarez' unhappiness with Bellator was deep-rooted in his heated and hate (and lawsuit) filled relationship with Rebney. Alvarez is just the latest poorly-handled Bellator champion and that blame really does seem to fall at Rebney's feet, so it still makes the list. What list? This list. Four worst Bellator champion goof-ups of the past year or so: 1. Bellator can't find new champion Zoila Gurgel challenger, ends up dropping women's divisions If your job is to put on fights and you can't find fights for a champion of yours, you're doing it wrong. Bellator once had solid female fighters on its roster, at a time when the UFC and Dana White still pretended women fighters were not good or plentiful. Over time, however, Bellator's matchmaking weaknesses made a casualty out of Gurgel and all women, most of whom went to Invicta. Coker has announced that Bellator is back in the women's MMA game, so hopefully he'll manage things much better than Rebney and company did. 2. Bellator releases the best fighter on their roster, welterweight champion Ben Askren All Ben Askren did was win, in dominating fashion, and with about the same finishing percentage as superstar and then-UFC 170 pound champ, Georges St. Pierre. However, winning impressively and repping Bellator hard wasn't enough for the promotion, and they let Askren walk away when they released him. Accor





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